Saturday, August 6, 2022

Today's read... Sharing Joy in the Neighborhood by Alexandra Cassel Schwartz

Today's read comes from the Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood world and features not only Daniel Tiger but Mr. McFeely, too. Of course, I'm expecting a very neighborly read with tons of good vibes and smiles. 

Ready to take a quick look?


SHARING JOY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD
by Alexandra Cassel Schwartz
Illustrated by Jason Fruchter
Simon Spotlight
Board Book
16 pages


A new generation of children love Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, inspired by the classic series Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood!

Daniel Tiger spreads joy around the neighborhood in this 8x8 storybook that comes with twelve perforated notes little tigers can use to write to their family and friends to spread joy around their own neighborhoods.

After receiving a special note from Grandpere, Daniel decides to write to the friends and family he misses, too! With Mr. McFeely’s help, he gets his notes off with a speedy delivery and brightens his neighbors’ days!

© 2022 The Fred Rogers Company

You can find this at:

AMAZON : https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1665912855?tag=simonsayscom

B&N :  https://www.anrdoezrs.net/click-7567305-11819508?SID=simonsayscom&url=http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/?ean=9781665912853

BOOKSHOP :  https://bookshop.org/books/sharing-joy-in-the-neighborhood/9781665912853



MY TIDBITS

Neighborliness abounds in an inspiring tale, while giving kids an idea on how to make their own neighbors smile.

Daniel Tiger is super happy to find the mailman delivering a letter to his house. After a bit of thought, he decides to send letters to his own neighbors, family, and friends. Now, to see if such an action will also make them smile.

This comes from the more modern shoot-off of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood and includes ever-so-loved characters such as the postman, Mr. McFeely. Being a board book, it is thought for younger readers and will take a bit of abuse. The pages are bright and bold, allowing the situations and emotions to come across clearly, so readers can flip through and discover the tale also on their own.

The entire thing is written in rhyme, which usually flows fine. There's a bit more text than in some board books, making it better as a read-aloud for slightly older audiences (3 to 5) than younger ones. But even younger ones will understand the message about sharing little things to make those around you smile.

It's an up-lifting read and will especially please Daniel Tiger fans.

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